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How do Egyptian Depictions Represent Metaphysical Concepts?  

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(@moustafa)
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26/04/2020 9:47 am  

How do Egyptian Depictions Represent Metaphysical Concepts?

We will show here the four main components of such Egyptian metaphysical depictions:

1. Man depiction signifies The Universe—Earthly and Divine
2. Animal Symbolism
3. Accessories, Emblems, color, etc.
4. Action forms

1. Man depiction signifies The Universe—Earthly and Divine
So many phrases are being used throughout the world which consistently state that the human being is made in the image of God (i.e. a miniature universe); and that to understand the universe is to understand oneself, and vice versa.

Yet, no culture has ever practiced the above principle like the Ancient Egyptians. Central to their complete understanding of the universe was the knowledge that man was made in the image of God and, as such, man represented the image of all creation.

Consistent with such thinking, a depicted human being represents both the universe as a whole as well as the human being on Earth.

According to Egyptian philosophy, though all creation is spiritual in origin, man is born mortal but contains within himself the seed of the divine. His purpose in this life is to nourish that seed, and his reward, if successful, is eternal life, where he will reunite with his divine origin.

Egyptian artwork clearly depicted the earthly man and the progression to ultimately become one with the Divine.

Egyptian figuration carefully marks—with a headband, crown, diadem, or joint—a dividing line for the top of the skull of the earthly man, thus separating the crown of the skull. The height of the body was measured exclusive of the crown. The illustrations show the earthly man as always higher than the divine aspects.

The horizontal line between the blocks of Abydos Temple below shows us clearly that this is an earthly man -- with his crown above those of the deities behind him -- in the process of self-development.

Also below is shown Egyptian figurations that carefully mark—with a headband, crown, diadem, or joint—a dividing line for the top of the skull of the earthly man, thus separating the crown of the skull. The height of the body was measured exclusive of the crown. The illustrations show the earthly man as always higher than the divine aspects. A clear example is found here in this Ancient Egyptian papyrus with a grid system, where a human is higher than the neter (god) Thoth.

The difference in the height between the two realms reflects the Ancient Egyptian deep understanding of the physiology and role of humans on earth.

The removal of this part of the human brain leaves man alive, but without discernment - hence, with no personal judgment. The person is in a vegetated state; i.e. living and acting only as the executant of an impulse that he receives, without actual choice. It is like a person in a coma.

The earthly being must use his cerebral instrument to choose his actions. These actions will be in agreement or at variance with natural harmony. If, during his/her earthly life, the actions are not harmonious with nature, s/he will reincarnate again to the earthly realm, to try another time.

[An excerpt from Egyptian Divinities : The All Who Are The ONE by Moustafa Gadalla

 

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